Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Write a Letter to Your Future Self

 This activity provides an opportunity to talk about the future. Keep the letter you composed to your future self! You will delight in seeing how far you have come, and you will once again be able to evaluate your goals.
What You Need:
  • Writing utensil
  • Paper
  • Envelope

What You Do:

  1. Before you begin, brainstorm what you will write about.: What are your current academic and social goals? What activities and people are important in your life? What are your current likes and dislikes? Where do you see yourself in 5 years, and what do you think you will be doing?
  2. Compose the letter to yourself in 5 years.
This letter writing process is a way to talk about what is important to you, and what you hope to achieve.
Ms. María

Monday, April 04, 2016

At home

Small objects in the home:
Write where you would usually find these items around a typical house. For example: A corkscrew in the kitchen.
Ms. María

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Say Something

I really like the strategy because you can see how the students are thinking about their texts and it gives them a tool to help them express more meaningful ideas about their reading. I didn't invent this, I just typed it up to tape to my tables. - See more at: http://schenkgr4.blogspot.com.es/search/label/Literacy#sthash.PUym3x2B.dpuf
Tools for speaking:
like the strategy because you can see how the students are thinking about their texts and it gives them a tool to help them express more meaningful ideas about their reading. I didn't invent this, I just typed it up to tape to my tables. - See more at: http://schenkgr4.blogspot.com.es/search/label/Literacy#sthash.PUym3x2B.dpuf
like the strategy because you can see how the students are thinking about their texts and it gives them a tool to help them express more meaningful ideas about their reading. I didn't invent this, I just typed it up to tape to my tables. - See more at: http://schenkgr4.blogspot.com.es/search/label/Literacy#sthash.PUym3x2B.dpuf
I really like the strategy because you can see how the students are thinking about their texts and it gives them a tool to help them express more meaningful ideas about their reading. I didn't invent this, I just typed it up to tape to my tables. - See more at: http://schenkgr4.blogspot.com.es/search/label/Literacy#sthash.PUym3x2B.dpuf
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByZ0eMz5vnK8QU9naDBFY1UxWWJYMlhjQnc4Zmsxd2t0ZjV3/edit?pref=2&pli=1
Ms. María

Wednesday, February 03, 2016

PET Listening test


Let's practise for our Preliminary English Test (PET) listening test. You can listen to the audio twice:
Score? 
Ms. María 

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

A Little - A Few and Little - Few

 The expressions a little and a few mean some:
  • If a noun is in singular, we use a littleExample: a little money. Uncountable nouns take a littleExample: 9 moneya little money.
  • If a noun is in plural, we use a fewExample: a few friends. Countable nouns take a fewExample: 4 friends, a few friends.
Without the article, little / few have a limiting or negative meaning: hardly any (not some). Examples: I need a little money. - I need some money.

I need little money. - I need hardly any money.
A few friends visited me. - Some friends visited me.
Few friends visited me. - Hardly any friends visited me.
Little / few sound rather formal. That's why we don't use them very often in everyday English. A negative sentence with much / many is more common here. Examples: I need little money. = I do not need much money.
Few friends visited me. = Not many friends visited me.
Now, click and check your level! 
Ms. María 

Monday, January 11, 2016

Talking about the Holidays

Happy new 2016! term!
We've taken a break around the Christmas period and spend time with their families. 
 Do anything exciting / special over the holidays?
Have you made any resolutions?
Remember that for giving a vague reply:
  • Nothing much.
  • Nothing special.
  • Oh, the usual…
  • Same old (= nothing new)
Ms. María 

Thursday, December 31, 2015

Where’s the party?

Confetti is dropped at midnight during New Year’s Eve celebrations in a lot of cities. But,how do you celebrate this last night of 2015?
Are you going to see the New Year in? (to see the New Year in means to celebrate the New Year at midnight.)
Ms. María 

Monday, December 21, 2015

Welcome winter

Winter is here! Avalanches, skiing, wintry, droplets, blizzards, ice-skating, coats, scarfs, boots, hot chocolate, icicles, cold, snow, North wind, warm up...What does winter mean to you?
Ms. María

Friday, December 11, 2015

Fawlty Towers

Basil and Manuel have a conversation about how to dress the breakfast trays:
Ms. María 

Wednesday, December 09, 2015

People collective nouns

A collective noun is a word which we use to define a group or collection of people, animals or things.
Don’t forget that a collective noun can also be made plural. We can say: three groups of people, etc.
Ms. María 

Monday, November 23, 2015

Part 5 of the PET Reading Paper

In Part 5 of the PET Reading Paper you complete a text with ten missing words. You have to choose one word from a choice of four (A, B, C or D). These missing words will often be synonyms, words that have a similar meaning like 'cheap' and 'inexpensive'.
Here is a list of synonyms you can use to describe things, feelings or people.
These quizzes will give you practice in the use of synonyms:
Ms. María 

Sunday, November 22, 2015

A Super Thanksgiving Treat!

This Thursday, 26th of November, is Thanksgiving dinner in the USA. There are a lot of chefs getting ideas for preparing the star of their Thanksgiving table. This menu is my attempt to honor their forefathers, could you match it?
Happy Thanksgiving!
I've cast up to my crazy potatoes as Pilgrims and Native Americans, who work together to create the best feast ever!:
http://www.storybots.com/thanksgiving/view/UbjkyEDNxj
Ms. María 

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Preparing for the Speaking Test

Hi,
Speaking is tested in Paper 3 of the Preliminary English Test. There are 4 speaking tasks and we've included practice tests for each part below.
Part 1: Each candidate interacts with the interlocutor using standardised questions.Try to say more than short one or two word answers. 2-3 minutes:
1
What’s your name?
2
How old are you?
3
What nationality are you?
4
Where do you live?
5
Are you are student?
Do you work or are you a student in …?
What do you do/ study?
6
Are you married? Have you got a boyfriend / girlfriend?
7
Can you spell your family name?
8
Do you enjoy studying English? Why? Why not?
9
Do you think that English will be useful for you in the future?
10
Have you got any brothers or sisters?
11
Have you got any children?
12
How do you get to school?
13
How long does it take to come to school?
14
Tell me about your day at school/college
15
Tell me about your family
16
What are your favourite foods?
17
What are your hobbies?
18
What are your plans after school?
19
What did you do yesterday / last weekend?
20
What do you do in your spare time?
21
What do you study? What are your favourite subjects?
22
What’s your job? What do you do?
Your answers to the Part 1 questions do not have to be very long but it will help the examiner assess your English if you say more than just one or two words. Be careful of questions that start 'Do you ...', 'Are you ...', 'Have you ...' as these can easily be answered with a simple 'Yes' or a 'No'.
Work with a partner.. Ask each other 'Yes' 'No questions and practise extending your answer a little with a reason, or an example. Like this:
Q: Do you like studying English?
A: Yes ... it's very exciting learning how to speak in another language.
Part 2: Simulated situation. Candidates interact with each other using visual simulus to discuss. 2-3 minutes. During the discussion in the exam you will need to show you can offer an opinion (I think ...), ask your partner for his/her opinion (Do you think ... Do you agree that ...) and make suggestions (Why don't we ... What about ...). Some of these words might be useful in this practice test: flask, hot drink, walking boots, sore feet, umbrella, phone, get in trouble first aid kit, plasters, compass, get lost.
The examiner is not interested in how good your ideas are. He or she will be listening to see how well you you can discuss things with your partner.
When you practise discussions try to show you are interested in what your partner has to say. Use expressions like this:
That's a good idea.
That's true.
Do you think so?
Part 3: Each candidate has a colour photography and they are asked to talk about/describe it for up to a minute. Both are relate to the same topic. 3 minutes. Try to make your talk easy to understand and follow. Use phrases like 'On the left ...', 'On the right ...', 'In the middle ...', 'In the background' to describe where things are.
The following vocabulary might be useful in this practice test: party, celebration, birthday, treats, grandparents, grandchildren, grandson, granddaughter, parents, children, sit around the table, enjoy a meal, salad, bowls of food.
An easy way to prepare for Part 3 is to talk to yourself! Whenever you are alone think of something you could talk about, for example, your plans for the weekend, what you would like to have for dinner what you did yesterday. Then try talking about this for a minute or two. Concentrate on speaking without long pauses - don't worry too much about making mistakes!
Part 4: Candidates talk together about their opinions, likes/dislikes... The theme is from part 3. 3 minutes. In the exam, as well as talking about your own opinions and experiences, remember to ask your partner for their own thoughts.
An easy way to prepare for Part 4 is simply to practise discussions in English. Talk about common subjects such as:
your last holiday
your favourite TV show
a good friend
a possession you couldn't do without
Sample of Speaking (Paper 3)
Ms. María